Effect of Pre-Liminate™ on Canine Stool Quality 

Research Report, November 4, 2015

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Introduction

Probiotics have been demonstrated to improve stool quality of distressed or immunocompromised dogs.  The positive effects of probiotics on the lower intestine are generally due to the enhanced immune response by the animal and also the displacement and inhibition of pathogenic bacteria by the probiotic bacteria. The animals used in this study were healthy adult beagles with no obvious signs of GIT distress.

Objective

To determine any effects of topical Pre-LiminateTM application on the stool quality of adult dogs.

Experimental Design

Crossover design with 6 dogs fed control kibble for 9 days followed by treated kibble for 5 days.

Treatment Variables:

Untreated kibble vs. the same kibble treated with probiotic premix.

Response Variables:

Stool quality score, stool color, stool odor.

Procedures

  1. The Pre-LiminateTM formula used was D3.1, consisting of commercial food-grade corn starch, dried fermentation products (Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium spp.), and silicon dioxide (flow agent).
  2. Dried commercial dog kibble was obtained from a major manufacturer. Kibble was treated with Pre-LiminateTM at the rate of 0.04 lb. to treat 40 lb. of kibble.  Kibble and premix were mixed in a 3.5 cubic foot polyethylene rotating cement mixer fitted with a cover having a small opening for adding the premix during mixing.  Total mixing time was 10 minutes.
  3. Samples of the untreated and treated kibbles were tested for the presence of the probiotic microorganisms. Treated kibble samples tested by standard methods in the Log10® laboratory had 9 million cfu/g of Lactobacillus and 7 million cfu/g of Bifidobacterium for a total of 16 million cfu/g. The total activity was equivalent to 16 billion cfu/kg and 7 billion cfu/lb.
  4. Untreated kibbles were fed daily to 6 dogs in a commercial kennel for 9 consecutive days. Daily total food offered was 300 grams throughout the trial. The same 6 dogs were switched to probiotic treated kibbles on day 10 and fed for 5 consecutive days. Stool quality scores were assigned daily to each dog.
  5. Stool Quality consists of three variables: texture, odor, and color.
    • Texture is evaluated using a 5 point scale, which is considered standard for companion animal feeding trials.
      • 1 = Liquid
      • 2 = Loose
      • 3 = Soft
      • 4 = Normal
      • 5 = Too Hard
    • Color is described as light, medium or dark brown.
    • Odor is noted only if there is a distinct difference in the sample compared to the other dogs.

 

Table 1.  Stool Quality Scores of dogs fed commercial kibble
Day
Dog 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
6 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

 

Table 2. Stool Quality Scores of dogs fed commercial kibble + Log10® Probiotic

Day

Dog 1 2 3 4 5
1 4 4 4 4 4
2 4 4 4 4 4
3 4 4 4 4 4
4 4 4 4 4 4
5 4 4 4 4 4
6 4 4 4 4 4

 

Table 3. Daily Feed Intake (grams)

Day1

Dog

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

1

300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300

300

2

282 300 300 300 300 300 300 275 227 300 201 300 300

274

3

300 300 300 300 300 229 171 300 228 300 248 171 208

300

4

300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300

300

5

300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 287 300 300 300
6 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 155 244 166

230

1Day 1-9 kibble with no probiotic; Days 10-14 kibble + probiotic

Results

  1. The dogs showed no difference between untreated and treated kibble in stool quality (Tables 1 and 2).
    • A stool quality score of 4 was observed for each dog each day regardless of treatment.
    • There were no differences noted in color or odor in any of the dogs regardless of treatment.
  2. Daily food intake was similar between treated and untreated kibble (Table 3).

Conclusions

Topical treatment of commercial dog food kibble with a Pre-LiminateTM had no effect on the stool quality of the dogs.  It is not ethical to induce distress in companion animal studies and it is difficult to effectively evaluate the effects of probiotics on stool quality in healthy dogs.

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This report of original research by Log10® is the property of Log10®, LLC and is intended to provide information to clients of Log10®.  It may not be copied or used either in part or in total without the permission of Log10®.  Additional copies may be obtained by contacting Log10® at 580-304-7953.

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